FOOTBRIDGES AN (IN)SUSTAINABLE TOURISM? (Portugal)

YRE Competition 2022–3rd Place, Video 15–18 Years, Loss of Biodiversity

On the beach, by the river or in the mountains, there is no shortage of walkways for walking or running. It was in the 1980s that the construction of these structures, usually in wood, began in Portugal. The walkways began as a way of protecting the dunes from trampling and preventing erosion. But in recent years, the footbridges have multiplied, following the growing trend of Nature Tourism. The ease of access has meant that they are now regarded mainly as recreational equipment. But what impacts does the construction and use of footbridges have? How can these be minimised?

DISSEMINATION

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbL33IEAryw&t=8s

https://jra.abae.pt/plataforma/video/passadicos-um-turismo-insustentavel/

https://www.facebook.com/jraportugal/posts/5433949866626272

https://twitter.com/yreportugal/status/1528395608746123264

FootnotesBruna Silva, Cátia Oliveira, Daniela Teixeira, Inês Sousa, Jéssica Costa, Pedro Freitas, Tânia Ribeiro, Teresa Gonçalves

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YRE International

Sharing the winning entries of the Int. Young Reporters for the Environment (YRE) Competition and the Litter Less Campaign (LLC) Competition. See www.yre.global